Blog

How to Catch More Illegal Weapons at ED Security: Expert Advice

How to catch more illegal guns at hospital emergency department security

May 6, 2015  |  David Martin and Kathy Clarke

“Security presence” in the emergency department can be as simple as an officer sitting in a chair at the greeter desk. Or it can be as involved as a metal detector, a canine team, and ambulance patient wanding. The level of security that is right for your hospital is best determined by local security and… | Read More

How the Best Nurse Leaders Decide Which Problem to Focus on First

How hurse leaders CNOs decide which problem to focus on first

April 28, 2015  |  Kristyna Culp and Dianne Foster

So you think you have a big chaotic mess and don’t know where to start? The Emergency Department (ED) boards patients. PACU backs up. Inpatient Average Length of Stay (ALOS) continues to increase. Patients wait for appointments. Patient satisfaction scores are not in the 90%+ category. Or, your facility’s market share is not at the… | Read More

Why Guess? Know How to Change Hospital Processes with Confidence

Change hospital processes with confidence

April 20, 2015  |  Kristyna Culp

If you don’t know for certain that a process change will work before you try it, you’re guessing. People guess because it’s easier than looking at data. Or because they have anecdotal evidence. “That transporter is always late and I have to take the patient myself!” Unfortunately a lot of anecdotal evidence just yields red herrings…. | Read More

How to Prove that Cutting Staff Won’t Actually Save Money

How to prevent hospital staff cuts

April 17, 2015  |  Kristyna Culp

When cutting costs, many hospitals trim less expensive staff, like techs and transporters. You may suspect this is a bad move, but we help you make the business case for creating the most efficient staffing model. We illustrate what happens when transporters don’t move admitted patients from the Emergency Department. When nurses pick up the… | Read More

The Truth About Unscheduled Patients: Predictably Reliable

order from chaos

April 15, 2015  |  Kristyna Culp

On any given day, a hospital knows its quantity of surgical patients because they schedule cases at least a week in advance. They can also predict the number of discharges and unscheduled patients even though they may seem random. With less precision, of course, but determining patterns and average ranges is not rocket science. When… | Read More